Tank Troublegaming Potatoes

I just saw a pic of someones fish tank, there was a sweet potato partially submerged with its roots.

The persons explained it helps remove nitrates?

This makes no senseOne hour versionhttp://youtu.be/sYGI1DheN4U.

Has anyone else heard of this?

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#2
5 years ago

I actually have never heard of that I am interested to see what people say. I might learn something myself,

#3
5 years ago

It looked good in her tank. I think it was mostly just the roots in the water, I tried doing some research on it, I was just curious. I can't imagine it's any better than regular aquarium plants.

I know my dad would put a potato in a cup of water for it to grow roots and plant it later, but if you left it too long I'm sure it would rot?

Maybe an experiment, just not in my tank.

#4
5 years ago

Truth is, almost ANY plant rooting in water will remove nitrates. It's what plants eat, so it makes sense. I have Pothos in some tanks, growing this way.

You might be surprised but the common sweet potato family, Ipomoea, contains a number of ornamental garden plants you see all over the place. Usually they are vines, but some of them have lovely flowers. Morning Glory is one.

So long as the roots are healthy, they're not a problem. The only issues tend to arise if you try to root a plant that may leach some type of toxin, ( I would not try any member of the Nightshade family, for example), or if they are water sensitive, in which case the roots may well begin to rot with some time.

Some plants can grow with roots in water for years and years.

#5
5 years ago
#6
5 years ago
#7
5 years ago
#8
Tank Troublegaming Potatoes

Tank Troublegaming Potatoes Recipes

3 years ago

I have several cuttings growing in my tanks. Within a week the empty stems had tap roots 2-3 inches long. After a week, roots are branched out and about 6-10 inches. Leaves have grown larger and cutting has fluffed out.

#9
2 years ago

I have bamboo in my tanks. Researching sweet potato

#10
2 years ago

Tank Troublegaming Potatoes In Water

That's interesting. Please post some pictures too.
👍

#11
Tank Troublegaming Potatoes
2 years ago

If you mean the Ipomea sp. vines that are grown as pot plants, you can grow them in a tank to root them and grow them that way as long as they're happy. Cuttings from these vines root very easily.

The Dracaena species that are sold as 'bamboo' or 'lucky bamboo' are very similar, in that they too are very willing to root in water and will continue to grow in nothing but water for a very long time.

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Fish water feeds them pretty well, providing nitrates if nothing else. I've seen Pothos vines that were many yards long, growing from roots in a fish tank or pond.

#12
Tank Troublegaming Potatoes
2 months ago

I have bamboo in my small pond. Never knew about the nitrates. Glad to know.

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